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Tips To Help You Take Care Of Your Asthma

Knowing what you can do and what you can avoid to keep your asthma in check, can give you a new lease on life and reduce the constant fear of when the next attack will be. The tips below will give you that information you need to live more peacefully.

A great tip that can help you get a grip on your asthma is to bring your own pillow when you travel anywhere. You never know how much dust there's going to be when you're staying at different places. Bringing your own clean pillow will reduce the risk of breathing in dust.

A great tip that can help you get a grip on your asthma is to bring your own pillow when you travel anywhere. You never know how much dust there's going to be when you're staying at different places. Bringing your own clean pillow will reduce the risk of breathing in dust.



To keep your asthma under control, you should only use non-aspirin pain relievers. Both Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and aleve can irritate the lungs and worsen the effects of your asthma over time. Tylenol has no negative effects on asthma users, and can be taken regularly without issue.

Properly use the inhaler every time you must use it. Find a quiet spot and follow the instructions the manufacturer has given. The inhaler can only help you if the medication actually reaches the lungs. Inhale deeply and spray the correct dose into your mouth. Make sure you hold your breath for 10 seconds or more to get the medications into your lungs.

If you suffer from asthma then you should avoid using NSAIDS or aspirin. These can trigger asthma or make it worse. Stick to Tylenol or acetaminophen for your pain control and fever reducing needs. You can also talk to you doctor about other possible substitutions.



If you have asthma, figure out what your triggers are. Indoor or outdoor allergens can trigger an asthma attack. If you know what your triggers are, you can remove them from your environment or take steps to avoid them. Educating yourself is the first step toward avoiding an asthma attack.

Keep an asthma diary to help you identify substances that trigger attacks or worsen symptoms. In this diary, keep track of foods and activities to help you pinpoint those items that cause asthma attacks. Your asthma diary is also beneficial when working with your doctor on your long-term management plan.

If you have been diagnosed with asthma then you want to be sure that your doctor prescribes for you a rescue inhaler. You will want to bring this rescue inhaler with you wherever you go. The reason for this is very simple: you simply never know when you will have an asthma attack.

When you know you have asthma be sure to exercise moderately. Excessive and prolonged physical activity may generate asthma attacks. Some people only have attacks during these exercises. Be sure to breathe through your nose when you exercise as breathing in cold air through your mouth can be the trigger of your attacks.

Shower or bathe each evening before going to bed to remove any allergens that can trigger an asthma attack. Sleeping with allergens on your skin or hair can not only cause an attack, but may make you even more sensitive to specific triggers over time.

Be your child's asthma advocate, especially at school. Many schools have policies in place that prohibit children from carrying medications on them. This is not acceptable when it comes to an emergency rescue inhaler. Find out what steps you need to take to make sure that your child has access to their medication as needed.

If you or a family member suffers from severe asthma, get a recommendation from your doctor on which hospital to visit before you go on vacation. You don't want to be hunting for a qualified hospital in the midst of an attack. Knowing in advance what doctors are good and how to get to them can cut down on the stress of the situation.

One of the most common things people do to make their asthma condition worse is putting their hands near their face. Your hands touch many different things throughout the day and when they are dirty, the particles can transfer from your hands to your face and then ultimately to https://www.citationbuilderpro.com/app/rss_file/Doctors_Immediate_Care_8369.rss your lungs. In order to prevent further complicating your asthma condition and reduce the chance of an asthma attack, wash your hands frequently and keep them away from your face.

You may think using fans indoors would be a good thing to help reduce your asthma symptoms. However, if there is any amount of dust in the area and the space is closed up, using a fan is only going to kick that dust up into the air that your breathe. This could trigger an asthma attack, so avoid using fans in closed up, dusty places.

Dust particles are a common asthma trigger, so try to eliminate them from your home. If possible remove carpeting from the home. Since dust often gets trapped in carpets it is a breeding ground for dust mites. If it is not possible to remove carpets, vacuum regularly with a cylinder vacuum that has a https://www.emedicinehealth.com/back_pain_health/article_em.htm sealed canister.

Bed linens often collect asthma aggravators, such as pollen, dust and allergens. If you put your pillowcases and sheets in hot water weekly, these inducers will be reduced or completely eliminated. Fresh, laundered bedding will help you sleep that much easier at night.

If you have asthma, take care to find out what your triggers are. Asthma attacks are triggered by anything from dust to tobacco smoke to dry air. Once you discover your trigger, take care to avoid being exposed to it. This can help to lessen the severity and recurrence of your asthma attacks.

The previous tips are great examples of what can be done in regards to asthma. By making an effort, people with asthma can enjoy somewhat normal lives without constant fear of an attack. These tidbits were just a part of the plethora of information that exists for asthma sufferers and their loved ones.

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